Race, gender, and flash photography

Race, gender, and flash photography

[ad_1] The cover of Flash! shows a smiling African-American woman, who holds a Graflex Speed Graphic camera. Clamped to the camera is a flash gun in the form of a thick column, topped by a flash bulb filled with crumpled aluminium foil, and a reflector shield. The flash bulb, invented at the very end of the 1920s, was rapidly adopted by both professional and amateur photographers, since it was far easier and less unpredictable to use than the tray of explosive powder that preceded it. If the metal post on…

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What is the value of rationality, and why does it matter?

What is the value of rationality, and why does it matter?

[ad_1] Rationality is a widely discussed term. Economists and other social scientists routinely talk about rational agents making rational choices in light of their rational expectations. It’s also common in philosophy, especially in those areas that are concerned with understanding and evaluating human thinking, actions, and institutions. But what exactly is rationality? In the past, most philosophers assumed that the central notion of rationality is a normative or evaluative concept: to think rationally is to think ‘properly’ or ‘well’—in other words, to think as one ‘should’ think. Rational thinking is…

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5 canon-breaking influences on modern literature

5 canon-breaking influences on modern literature

[ad_1] As a discipline, literature is vast, encompassing poetry, prose, and drama from across history, as well as the more modern disciplines of film and media studies. In the modern world, the idea of literature has taken on new meaning as new concepts and technologies have emerged with the changing culture. From internet memes and viral content, to ecocriticism and even the occasional zombie—enjoy a wander through a five captivating and eclectic topics in the world of literature. How are internet memes and viral content forms of literature? The internet…

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A composer’s Christmas: Malcolm Archer

A composer’s Christmas: Malcolm Archer

[ad_1] We spoke with composer Malcolm Archer about the pleasure of driving his 1964 Austin Healey 3000 on crisp December days, the magic of the Christmas story, and spending Christmas in Chicago. What’s your favourite thing about the Christmas season? Being a church musician, I would have to say the choral singing and the services. It is also very gratifying to see the huge pleasure that choristers gain from singing Christmas music. There is something very direct and poignant about the Christmas settings, which goes right to heart of the…

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Animal of the Month: 12 facts about reindeer

Animal of the Month: 12 facts about reindeer

[ad_1] We all know the stories about reindeer; Father Christmas’s magical steeds fly his famous sleigh to the homes of children around the world on Christmas Eve, eat the carrots we leave for them, and are recipients of occasional genetic mutations causing shiny red noses. But where do they come from? How do those not pulling Santa’s sleigh spend their time? And are their noses really that special? The reindeer, also known as caribou in North America, is a species of deer of the tundra and subarctic regions of Eurasia…

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Hubert Parry (1848-1918) | OUPblog

Hubert Parry (1848-1918) | OUPblog

[ad_1] 2018 marks the centenary of the death of Hubert Parry, one of the finest and most influential ­musicians of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Over the last few months I have had the privilege of making the first critical edition of his late choral masterpiece, the Songs of Farewell, with reference to the autograph manuscripts, held in the Bodleian Library, and a set of early printed versions. I’ve known these marvellous pieces for years—partly through the classic recording made by Christopher Robinson and the Choir of St…

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Test your knowledge of the English legal system

Test your knowledge of the English legal system

[ad_1] The English legal system has a long history of traditions and symbolism. Do you know your periwigs from your powdered wigs, your judicial dress from your barrister’s robes, and your green bags from your gavels? While some of the quirks and traditions of the English legal system may seem archaic, even bizarre, they from part of the fundamental constitution of UK culture and are therefore of relevance to anyone with an interest in it. Questions and answers are taken from Geoffrey Rivlin, First Steps in the Law, 7th edition and…

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Nine of diamonds, or the curse of Scotland: an etymological drama in two acts. Act 2, Scene 2

Nine of diamonds, or the curse of Scotland: an etymological drama in two acts. Act 2, Scene 2

[ad_1] See the previous posts with the same title. We are approaching the end of the drama. It will be a thriller without a denouement, a tragedy without catharsis, but such are most etymological dramas. Putting the kibosh on the origin of a hard word or phrase is an almost impossible endeavor. Heraldry for etymologists and a note on unlikely candidates It has been said, and for good reason, that, whenever people played cards, every man whose unpopularity made him hated by the people and bearing as arms nine lozenges…

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Using evolutionary history to save pangolins from extinction

Using evolutionary history to save pangolins from extinction

[ad_1] Pangolins, or scale-bodied anteaters, are a unique lineage of mammals exclusively feeding on ants and termites. Eight species are distributed across Africa and Asia. They all show extraordinary adaptation to myrmecophagy (specialized diet of ants and termites), including a scaled armor covering the body and tail that protects them from bites (both from bugs and large predators!), powerful arms and claws to rip anthills and termite mounds open, toothless jaws, and a long, sticky tongue that can reach 70 cm in the largest species (the giant pangolin). Much can…

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Pain relief and palliative care around the world

Pain relief and palliative care around the world

[ad_1] Around the world access to pain relief and to palliative care services is emerging as a growing public health issue. In many countries getting appropriate pain relieving drugs for those with advanced disease is constrained by overly-zealous laws and procedures. Likewise the provision of palliative care education, research and delivery, although making some headway and achieving policy recognition in places, is still extremely limited, often where the need is greatest. In such a context of halting progress, the recent report from the Lancet Commission on Pain and Palliative Care…

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