Blue Planet II: is the ocean really the ‘largest habitat on Earth’?

Blue Planet II: is the ocean really the ‘largest habitat on Earth’?

Home> Published: 31 October 2017 Blue Planet II celebrates the diversity of Earth’s ocean habitats. (C) BBC/Lisa Labinjoh/Joe Platko Dr Jon Copley, Associate Professor in Ocean Exploration & Public Engagement at the University of Southampton and a scientific adviser for BBC television’s Blue Planet II, assesses the oceans of information available about life beneath the waves. “The ocean: the largest habitat on Earth” – those words, spoken by Sir David Attenborough at the start of the “prequel” to Blue Planet II, capture the scope, focus, and justification for the BBC Natural History Unit’s…

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New cancer drug shows promise in helping patients with blood cancer

New cancer drug shows promise in helping patients with blood cancer

Home> Published: 31 October 2017 Southampton drug discovery shows promise in helping patients with blood cancer An immunology discovery from the laboratories at the University of Southampton has now been shown to improve the outcomes of a common type of blood cancer in patients. Follicular lymphoma is a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and develops when the body makes abnormal white blood cells that fight infection, called B-lymphocytes. It can be slow-growing and does not always need to be treated straight away but when treatment is needed, it usually involves a combination of chemotherapy…

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Versatile marine bacteria could be an influence on global warming, scientists discover

Versatile marine bacteria could be an influence on global warming, scientists discover

Home> Published: 2 November 2017 Dr Jessika Fuessel, lead author of the new study Scientists have discovered that a ‘rare’ type of marine bacteria is much more widespread than previously thought – and possesses a remarkable metabolism that could contribute to greenhouse gas production. In a study published in the journal Science Advances, an international team of scientists from the University of Southampton, the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, in Germany, and other European universities show that the previously little-studied Nitrococcus bacterium is found in oceans worldwide, and has the astonishing ability…

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Southampton researchers lead ‘first of its kind’ study to extend lives of men with incurable prostate cancer

Southampton researchers lead ‘first of its kind’ study to extend lives of men with incurable prostate cancer

Home> Published: 2 November 2017 New study to extend lives of men with incurable prostate cancer Researchers from the University of Southampton are set to lead a new precision medicine study for prostate cancer which has the potential to extend the lives of 9,000 men every year in the UK. The study is part of a major new research programme launched today by men’s health charity, Prostate Cancer UK. The research drive will tailor treatments for men based on the genetic make-up of their cancer and marks a significant shift from the traditional…

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Bowel cancer patients without vital social support are twice as likely to have poorer overall health

Bowel cancer patients without vital social support are twice as likely to have poorer overall health

Home> Published: 2 November 2017 Social support important in cancer patients’ wellbeing Bowel cancer patients who lack a key type of social support are more than twice as likely to experience poorer overall health and quality of life, according to new research by the University of Southampton and Macmillan Cancer Support published today in the journal Psycho-Oncology. Those lacking ‘positive social interaction’, such as having someone to do something enjoyable or relax with, were more likely to face problems. These could include experiencing severe pain, having serious problems with moving around or having…

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Time is right to capitalise on artificial intelligence

Time is right to capitalise on artificial intelligence

18 specific recommendations Through our review, we made 18 specific recommendations including a number that focus on ways in which universities, research institutes, industry and government can come together to better prepare us for the AI landscape of the future. Universities are on the ‘front line’ to help prepare and upskill the country’s future workforce, but they’re also key to the future of research, development and commercialisation of AI to benefit the economy and society as a whole.   We’ve emphasised the importance of skills and the need to increase the…

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Building a Superhuman – right, wrong or just science fiction?

Building a Superhuman – right, wrong or just science fiction?

Published: 8 November 2017 Using stem cells to regrow bone tissue; discovering how eating salmon during pregnancy can reduce the risk of allergies and cardiovascular disease in children; and making novel sensor devices to measure the environment in the womb are just some of the amazing discoveries from the Institute of Developmental Sciences (IDS) at the University of Southampton. For the past decade the research carried out by IDS scientists has changed our ideas about the importance of early development and its impact on our later health. Today (Wednesday, 8 November) the IDS will…

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Scientists to monitor astronauts’ muscle health, thanks to space agency funding

Scientists to monitor astronauts’ muscle health, thanks to space agency funding

Published: 8 November 2017 Scientists will test the muscle health of astronauts on the International Space Station. Scientists at the University of Southampton will carry out the first study of the effects of space flight on human muscle tone, thanks to a grant from the UK Space Agency. Maria Stokes, Professor of Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation at the University of Southampton, has been awarded £191,892 for her team’s part in an international project to monitor the muscle health of astronauts on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS). The loss of skeletal muscle mass…

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Marine sensors funding will help researchers probe mysteries of the deep

Marine sensors funding will help researchers probe mysteries of the deep

Published: 9 November 2017 Researchers at the University of Southampton have received a share of more than £4m in funding to develop sensors capable of working in extreme ocean conditions. Two projects at the University, and a further two with University involvement at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) in Southampton, are among five to be awarded a total of £4.3m by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). The sensors that will result from the projects – designed to be compatible with autonomous underwater systems such as NOC’s autosub Boaty McBoatface – will be…

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Scientist calls on public to help ‘unlock’ genes of threatened bat species

Scientist calls on public to help ‘unlock’ genes of threatened bat species

Published: 13 November 2017 The endangered barbastelle bat. Credit: Antton Alberdi A University of Southampton scientist is calling on the public’s help in her bid to unlock the genetic secrets of an endangered bat species. Dr Orly Razgour is championing the barbastelle bat as part of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute’s 25 Genomes project, a scheme to ‘map’ the genes of 25 UK species to mark the research organisation’s 25th anniversary. Five of the species that will have their genomes (their complete sets of genetic material) sequenced will be chosen in a public…

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