Newton and the perils of the imagination

Newton and the perils of the imagination

[ad_1] In the 17th century, there were two contradictory attitudes to the imagination or ‘phantasy’. For many it was valued as the source of wit and invention; but for others it was the basis of deception, superstition, and mental illness. It was John Calvin, a century earlier, who had warned that the mind was a dungeon and a factory of idols. English puritan writers followed in his wake, cautioning against the seductive tendencies of the unregenerate imagination, which tempted believers to mistake for the works of God what were really…

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Good and evil: the role of smugglers in the migrant crisis [excerpt]

Good and evil: the role of smugglers in the migrant crisis [excerpt]

[ad_1] Since its inception in 2000, International Migrants Day has served as a platform to discuss human rights issues affecting migrants. This year, the UN is focusing on safe migration in a world on the move—opening up an international dialogue about how to ensure safe and systematic migration during times of instability. The migration system today is largely dependent on smugglers: as millions seek to escape violence and economic inequality, many become dependent on criminal networks to facilitate their transport. In the following excerpt from Migrant, Refugee, Smuggler, and Savior,…

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Suing a company when you didn’t use its product

Suing a company when you didn’t use its product

[ad_1] Ordinarily, American law says that you can sue a company only if you used the company’s product and that product injured you. Due to an odd quirk of pharmaceutical law, people who live in several of the United States are about to learn whether that fundamental principle remains true. The United States Food and Drug Administration tells pharmaceutical manufacturers what the manufacturers can say on a drug’s labeling. For the innovator-manufacturer – the company that discovered a new molecule and turned it into a drug – the FDA occasionally…

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Campaign to build unique cancer research centre ends the year on a high

Campaign to build unique cancer research centre ends the year on a high

[ad_1] Home> Published: 12 December 2017 Centre for Cancer Immunology The University of Southampton’s campaign to build a new centre dedicated to cancer immunology research has just £1m to go before hitting its target. The Centre for Cancer Immunology is the first of its kind in the UK and will bring together world leading cancer scientists under one roof and enable interdisciplinary teams to expand clinical trials and develop lifesaving drugs. The University launched a £25m campaign in 2015 to build the Centre and has now reached £24m. The campaign has been fully…

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Breathing exercises help asthma patients with quality of life

Breathing exercises help asthma patients with quality of life

[ad_1] Home> Published: 14 December 2017 A study led by the University of Southampton has found that people who continue to get problems from their asthma, despite receiving standard treatment, experience an improved quality of life when they are taught breathing exercises. The majority of asthma patients have some degree of impaired quality of life. Researchers, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), also found that the benefits of the breathing exercises were similar, whether they were taught in person by a physiotherapist in three face-to-face sessions, or delivered digitally for…

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Starving white dwarf stars are binge eaters, find astronomers

Starving white dwarf stars are binge eaters, find astronomers

[ad_1] Home> Published: 14 December 2017 A white dwarf sucks matter from a star in the MV Lyrae system. Credit: Knigge/Scaringi/Uthas An international team of scientists, including an astronomer from the University of Southampton, has made a significant discovery about the ‘feeding habits’ of white dwarf stars. A white dwarf is what stars like the Sun become after they have exhausted their nuclear fuel. They are extremely dense objects similar in size to the Earth, but with roughly as much mass as the Sun. Some white dwarfs have a nearby companion star. In…

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Scientists pinpoint gene to blame for poorer survival rate in early-onset breast cancer patients

Scientists pinpoint gene to blame for poorer survival rate in early-onset breast cancer patients

[ad_1] Home> Published: 15 December 2017 Credit: Shutterstock A new study led by scientists at the University of Southampton has found that inherited variation in a particular gene may be to blame for the lower survival rate of patients diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women, with nearly 450,000 deaths per year from the disease worldwide. However, women aged 15-39 at diagnosis have a poorer chance of surviving their cancer than older women* (although survival rates for the disease are generally high). This…

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Franz Brentano: 100 years after

Franz Brentano: 100 years after

[ad_1] Franz Brentano died on the 17 of March 1917. His main work Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint (1874) combines an Aristotelian view of the mind with empiricist methodology inspired by the likes of William Hamilton and John Stuart Mill. Brentano’s philosophical program was to show that every concept can ultimately be derived from perceptions: he was a concept empiricist. In Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint, the program is applied to the concept of the mental in general, as well to as notions of particular mental phenomena. When one takes…

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English usage guides | OUPblog

English usage guides | OUPblog

[ad_1] My own collection of usage guides (see image below). I’ve collected quite a few of them since the start of the Bridging the Unbridgeable project in 2011. The aim of the project is to study usage guides and usage problems in British and American English, as well as attitudes to disputed usages like the split infinitive, the placement of only, the flat adverb, and many more. I scavenged every second-hand book shop, not only in Cambridge where I was spending a sabbatical at the time, but, once back home, also…

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Connecting clinical presence and clinical knowledge in music therapy

Connecting clinical presence and clinical knowledge in music therapy

[ad_1] In all clinical practices, students must learn to make meaning of clinical information such as, “What does it mean that the client said this or did that? What is the client’s body saying when it does or does not do this?” For music therapy students, there is the additional consideration of music, namely “What does it mean when the client plays music like this? What does it mean when the client hears this music like that?” This has led me to wonder how music therapy students learn to make…

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